JOINT Briefs

The EU as an (In)Significant Player in Libya

Factors that limit the EU’s effectiveness in promoting the Libyan peace process can be categorised into three streams: damage control approach, soft power approach and EU internal divisions.[1] To a convincing extent, these factors explain why the EU cannot be considered a significant player in the Libyan peace process. However, there are alternative means through […]

JOINT Papers

Framing Public Perception of the Challenges to the EU Foreign Security and Defence Policy. Focus Groups as a Method of Investigation

This report presents the results of twelve focus groups carried out in six European countries (France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Poland and Spain) and addressing topics of concern for the study of EU foreign security and defence policy. In particular, participants were engaged in discussions on three main topics: (1) the most pressing international challenges and […]

JOINT Briefs

Laying the Groundwork for Peace in a Fragmented Libya

Libya is fragmented, and this fragmentation raises questions about legitimacy for whoever emerges as the winner of the presidential elections, now scheduled for early 2022. Legitimacy is one of the underlying challenges that engenders post-election conflict in many African societies. To avoid post-election conflict in Libya, stakeholders like the European Union, by way of anticipation, […]

Events

Roundtable/ “Post-election Libya and the European Union” organized by IPSS

On Wednesday, 23 February, the Institute for Peace and Security Studies (IPSS- Addis Ababa University) will host a JOINT Roundtable to discuss extent to which the EU’s agenda for Libya is fit-for-purpose, considering the fragmented nature of Libya’s geopolitical context further highlighted by the postponement of the Libyan elections to an undefined date. Panel: Youssef […]

News

Brief/Laying the Groundwork for Peace in a Fragmented Libya by Jesutimilehin O. Akamo

In this JOINT Brief, Jesutimilehin O. Akamo (IPSS – Institute for Peace and Security Studies) analyses the concerns that the level of fragmentation in Libya raises about post-election conflicts and proposes an approach that stakeholders like the EU may adopt to help prevent these conflicts.

JOINT Briefs

Identity and Transitional Justice in the Horn of Africa and Libya

Identity and conflict shape each other. This is evident in the historical trajectory of the Horn of Africa (HoA) – notably in the conflicts in the Gambella region, between Ethiopia and Eritrea, in Somalia and Tigray – as well as of Libya during and after the long autocratic rule of Muammar Gaddafi.[1] The nexus between […]

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